Monthly Archives: December 2013

Finding Success with Your New Year’s Resolutions

Many people use this time of year to get a “fresh start” and make some changes in their lives. Most of the time these changes involve self-improvement like losing weight, exercising more, quitting smoking or addressing an emotional or relationship problem that has been worrisome. It is natural to use the ending of one year and the beginning of another to reflect on our lives, where we are headed and where we have been.This self-reflection can be a very insightful and positive exercise.

Regardless of what kind of change you may want to make, it is important to have realistic expectations of ourselves and to have a plan of action. When we are motivated to make a change, we are pumped up and want our excitement to translate into quick results! Unfortunately, this just does not happen as our habits are formed slowly, weight is put on over months and years, emotional and relationship problems evolve over time. But, DO NOT GET DISCOURAGED and stop your efforts to feel better and live better if you don’t see or feel results within a few days!

Here are some tips to help you be more successful with your New Year’s Resolutions:

1.Get rid of the words “always” and “never.” Don’t say that I am “always” going to go to the gym after work as there will be days that you simply can’t go every day at the same time. It is then too easy to say that “I blew it! I give up!” and just quit going to the gym altogether. Sometimes when people are going to lose weight they say “I am never going to eat chocolate again!” These statements are too rigid and absolute and don’t allow for the flexibility we all need in our lives.

2.Take your time. Lasting behavior change takes time to sink in and become routine. Additionally, our bodies need time to adjust to changes in physical activity, diet and quitting smoking, alcohol and caffeine.

3.Question why you are making a change. Are you quitting smoking because your spouse is nagging you incessantly? Are you trying to manage anxiety because your family said that you are driving them nuts? Successful life changes happen when we are able to identify what we personally plan to get out of that change. How will you FEEL if you quit smoking? Will you have more energy? Will you hopefully live longer to see your grandchildren grow up? How will your life be better if you finally get that claustrophobia under control? When we are able to connect with what WE will get out of making a change, we are far more likely to stick with it.

Best wishes for a happy, healthy New Year!

Dana Nolan, Mental Health Counselor

And

Tejal Parekh, RegisteredDietitian

Healthy Living Counseling, LLC

Some Thoughts on Holiday Stress and Anxiety

From the desk of Dana Nolan, Licensed Mental Health Counselor: It is that time of year again!  We will soon be seeing television commercials or images in magazines depicting families enjoying the holidays.  We see artfully decorated trees and beautifully set tables covered with perfectly cooked food.   Family members all appear to be getting along and are dressed in color-coordinated festive attire.

Do we ever see a frazzled mother frantically trying to get all the food on the table while it is still hot?   Where is that crazy relative who likes to tell jokes that not everyone thinks are funny?  We don’t see children running around the house excitedly fueled by too much candy or cookies.

Our lives usually feel stressful enough throughout the year. The holiday season can overwhelm us further if we feel compelled to live up to unrealistic expectations of what our holidays should be like.  Those “shoulds” can come from what we see in the movies or on TV.  They can come from childhood holiday memories.  The “shoulds” can be further fueled by pressure to keep up with the Jones’ down the road in terms how much money they spend on their children’s gifts or holiday decorations or similar stress and anxiety.

Take a moment and think about what is really important to you during the holiday season.  Think back on previous holidays and pick out your most enjoyable memories and do more of those things.   Stop for a moment when you think or feel a “should” about what you are doing this holiday season.   Where is that should coming from?   Is it a realistic and meaningful “should” that we have for our holidays?  If we can let go of unrealistic holiday expectations and focus on what is meaningful to us during the holidays, then we can get through this time of year more happily and healthfully!